Category Archives: Publications

Network Architecture of Gap Junctional Coupling among Parallel Processing Channels in the Mammalian Retina

We have a new manuscript out in The Journal of Neuroscience, Network Architecture of Gap Junctional Coupling among Parallel Processing Channels in the Mammalian Retina.

Authors: Crystal L. Sigulinsky @CLSigulinsky, James R. Anderson, Ethan Kerzner @EthanKerzner, Christopher N. Rapp @ChrisNRapp, Rebecca L. Pfeiffer @BeccaPfeiffer19, Taryn M. Rodman, Daniel P. Emrich, Kevin D. Rapp, Noah T. Nelson @nooneelseinhere, J. Scott Lauritzen, Miriah Meyer@miriah_meyer, Robert E. Marc @robertmarc60, and Bryan W. Jones @BWJones.

Abstract: Gap junctions are ubiquitous throughout the nervous system, mediating critical signal transmission and integration, as well as emergent network properties. In mammalian retina, gap junctions within the Aii amacrine cell-ON cone bipolar cell (CBC) network are essential for night vision, modulation of day vision, and contribute to visual impairment in retinal degenerations, yet neither the extended network topology nor its conservation is well established. Here, we map the network contribution of gap junctions using a high-resolution connectomics dataset of an adult female rabbit retina. Gap junctions are prominent synaptic components of ON CBC classes, constituting 5%–25% of all axonal synaptic contacts. Many of these mediate canonical transfer of rod signals from Aii cells to ON CBCs for night vision, and we find that the uneven distribution of Aii signals to ON CBCs is conserved in rabbit, including one class entirely lacking direct Aii coupling. However, the majority of gap junctions formed by ON CBCs unexpectedly occur between ON CBCs, rather than with Aii cells. Such coupling is extensive, creating an interconnected network with numerous lateral paths both within, and particularly across, these parallel processing streams. Coupling patterns are precise with ON CBCs accepting and rejecting unique combinations of partnerships according to robust rulesets. Coupling specificity extends to both size and spatial topologies, thereby rivaling the synaptic specificity of chemical synapses. These ON CBC coupling motifs dramatically extend the coupled Aii-ON CBC network, with implications for signal flow in both scotopic and photopic retinal networks during visual processing and disease.

Immunization Against Oxidized Elastin Exacerbates Structural and Functional Damage in Mouse Model of Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

We have a new manuscript out in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Immunization Against Oxidized Elastin Exacerbates Structural and Functional Damage in Mouse Model of Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

Authors: Balasubramaniam Annamalai; Crystal Nicholson; Nathaniel Parsons; Sarah Stephenson; Carl Atkinson; Bryan Jones; and Bärbel Rohrer.

Purpose: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in Western populations. While an overactive complement system has been linked to pathogenesis, mechanisms contributing to its activation are largely unknown. In aged and AMD eyes, loss of the elastin layer (EL) of Bruch’s membrane (BrM) has been reported. Elastin antibodies are elevated in patients with AMD, the pathogenic significance of which is unclear. Here we assess the role of elastin antibodies using a mouse model of smoke-induced ocular pathology (SIOP), which similarly demonstrates EL loss.

Methods: C57BL/6J mice were immunized with elastin or elastin peptide oxidatively modified by cigarette smoke (ox-elastin). Mice were then exposed to cigarette smoke or air for 6 months. Visual function was assessed by optokinetic response, retinal morphology by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and electron microscopy, and complement activation and antibody deposition by Western blot.

Results: Ox-elastin IgG and IgM antibodies were elevated in ox-elastin immunized mice following 6 months of smoke, whereas elastin immunization had a smaller effect. Ox-elastin immunization exacerbated smoke-induced vision loss, with thicker BrM and more damaged retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria compared with mice immunized with elastin or nonimmunized controls. These changes were correlated with increased levels of IgM, IgG2, IgG3, and complement activation products in RPE/choroid.

Conclusions: These data demonstrate that SIOP mice generate elastin-specific antibodies and that immunization with ox-elastin exacerbates ocular pathology. Elastin antibodies represented complement fixing isotypes that, together with the increased presence of complement activation seen in immunized mice, suggest that elastin antibodies exert pathogenic effects through mediating complement activation.

Müller Cell Metabolic Signatures: Evolutionary Conservation and Disruption in Disease

We have a new manuscript out in Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, Müller Cell Metabolic Signatures: Evolutionary Conservation and Disruption in Disease.

Authors: Rebecca L. Pfeiffer @BeccaPfeiffer19, Robert E. Marc @robertmarc60, and Bryan William Jones @BWJones.

This manuscript functions as both a review and presents some exciting new data demonstrating how the glutamate cycle is disrupted during retinal degenerative disease.

Abstract: Müller cells are glia that play important regulatory roles in retinal metabolism. These roles have been evolutionarily conserved across at least 300 million years. Müller cells have a tightly locked metabolic signature in the healthy retina, which rapidly degrades in response to insult and disease. This variation in metabolic signature occurs in a chaotic fashion, involving some central metabolic pathways. The cause of this divergence of Müller cells, from a single class with a unique metabolic signature to numerous separable metabolic classes, is currently unknown and illuminates potential alternative metabolic pathways that may be revealed in disease. Understanding the impacts of this heterogeneity on degenerate retinas and the implications for the metabolic support of surrounding neurons will be critical to long-term integration of retinal therapeutics for the restoration of visual perception following photoreceptor degeneration.

Optic Cup Morphogenesis Requires Neural Crest-Mediated Basement Membrane Assembly

We have a new manuscript out in Development, Optic cup morphogenesis requires neural crest-mediated basement membrane assembly.

Authors: Chase D. Bryan @CDBE30, Macaulie A. Casey, Rebecca L. Pfeiffer @BeccaPfeiffer19, Bryan W. Jones @BWJones, and Kristen M. Kwan @BlockInTheBack

This is a collaborative project out of the Kwan lab that we helped out with some of the ultrastructural work and analysis.

Abstract: Organogenesis requires precise interactions between a developing tissue and its environment. In vertebrates, the developing eye is surrounded by a complex extracellular matrix as well as multiple mesenchymal cell populations. Disruptions to either the matrix or periocular mesenchyme can cause defects in early eye development, yet in many cases, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, using multidimensional imaging and computational analyses in zebrafish, we establish that cell movements in the developing optic cup require neural crest. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that basement membrane formation around the developing eye is also dependent on neural crest, but only specifically around the retinal pigment epithelium. Neural crest cells produce the extracellular matrix protein nidogen: impairing nidogen function disrupts eye development, and strikingly, expression of nidogen in the absence of neural crest partially restores optic cup morphogenesis. These results demonstrate that eye formation is regulated in part by extrinsic control of extracellular matrix assembly.

Pathoconnectome Analysis of Müller Cells in Early Retinal Remodeling

We have a new manuscript out in Clinical Neurophysiology, An Update on Retinal Prostheses. PubMedDirect Link PDF here.

Authors: Rebecca L Pfeiffer, James R Anderson, Daniel P Emrich, Jeebika Dahal, Crystal L Sigulinsky, Hope AB Morrison, Jia-Hui Yang, Carl B Watt, Kevin D Rapp, Mineo Kondo, Hiroko Terasaki, Jessica C Garcia, Robert E Marc, and Bryan W Jones.

Abstract: Glia play important roles in neural function, including but not limited to amino acid recycling, ion homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and waste removal. During retinal degeneration and subsequent retinal remodeling, Müller cells (MCs) are the first cells to show metabolic and morphological alterations in response to stress. Metabolic alterations in MCs chaotically progress in retina undergoing photoreceptor degeneration; however, what relationship these alterations have with neuronal stress, synapse maintenance, or glia-glia interactions is currently unknown. The work described here reconstructs a MC from a pathoconnectome of early retinalremodeling retinalpathoconnectome 1 (RPC1) and explores relationships between MC structural and metabolic phenotypes in the context of neighboring neurons and glia. Here we find variations in intensity of osmication inter- and intracellularly, variation in small molecule metabolic content of MCs, as well as morphological alterations of glial endfeet. RPC1 provides a framework to analyze these relationships in early retinal remodeling through ultrastructural reconstructions of both neurons and glia. These reconstructions, informed by quantitative metabolite labeling via computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), allow us to evaluate neural-glial interactions in early retinal degeneration with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity.

 

 

An Update On Retinal Prostheses

We have a new manuscript out in Clinical Neurophysiology, An Update on Retinal Prostheses. PubMedDirect Link PDF here.

Authors: Lauren N. Ayton, Nick Barnes, Gislin Dagnelie, Takashi Fujikado, Georges Goetz, Ralf Hornig, Bryan W. Jones, Mahiul M.K. Muqit, Daniel L. Rathbun, Katarina Stingl, James D. Weiland, Matthew A. Petoe.

Abstract: Retinal prostheses are designed to restore a basic sense of sight to people with profound vision loss. They require a relatively intact posterior visual pathway (optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cor- tex). Retinal implants are options for people with severe stages of retinal degenerative disease such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration.

There have now been three regulatory-approved retinal prostheses. Over five hundred patients have been implanted globally over the past 15 years. Devices generally provide an improved ability to localize high-contrast objects, navigate, and perform basic orientation tasks. Adverse events have included con- junctival erosion, retinal detachment, loss of light perception, and the need for revision surgery, but are rare. There are also specific device risks, including overstimulation (which could cause damage to the retina) or delamination of implanted components, but these are very unlikely.
Current challenges include how to improve visual acuity, enlarge the field-of-view, and reduce a com- plex visual scene to its most salient components through image processing. This review encompasses the work of over 40 individual research groups who have built devices, developed stimulation strategies, or investigated the basic physiology underpinning retinal prostheses. Current technologies are summarized, along with future challenges that face the field.

 

 

Contrast Sensitivity Isocontours Of The Central Visual Field

We have a new manuscript out in Nature Scientific Reports, Contrast Sensitivity Isocontours Of The Central Visual Field.

Authors: Agnes Y. J. Choi, Lisa Nivison-Smith, Jack Phu, Barbara Zangerl, Sieu K. Khuu, Bryan W. Jones, Rebecca L. Pfeiffer, Robert E. Marc & Michael Kalloniatis.

Abstract: Standard automated perimetry (SAP), the most common form of perimetry used in clinical practice, is associated with high test variability, impacting clinical decision making and efficiency. Contrast sensitivity isocontours (CSIs) may reduce test variability in SAP by identifying regions of the visual field with statistically similar patterns of change that can be analysed collectively and allow a point (disease)-to-CSI (normal) comparison in disease assessment as opposed to a point (disease)-to-point (normal) comparison. CSIs in the central visual field however have limited applicability as they have only been described using visual field test patterns with low, 6° spatial sampling. In this study, CSIs were determined within the central 20° visual field using the 10-2 test grid paradigm of the Humphrey Field Analyzer which has a high 2° sampling frequency. The number of CSIs detected in the central 20° visual field was greater than previously reported with low spatial sampling and stimulus size dependent: 6 CSIs for GI, 4 CSIs for GII and GIII, and 3 CSIs for GIV and GV. CSI number and distribution were preserved with age. Use of CSIs to assess visual function in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) found CSI guided analysis detected a significantly greater deviation in sensitivity of AMD eyes from normal compared to a standard clinical pointwise comparison (−1.40 ± 0.15 dB vs −0.96 ± 0.15 dB; p < 0.05). This work suggests detection of CSIs within the central 20° is dependent on sampling strategy and stimulus size and normative distribution limits of CSIs can indicate significant functional deficits in diseases affecting the central visual field such as AMD.

Development Of A Spatial Model Of Age-Related Change In The Macular Ganglion Cell Layer To Predict Function From Structural Changes

We have a new paper out in the Americal Journal of Ophthalmology, Development of a spatial model of age-related change in the macular ganglion cell layer to predict function from structural changes.

Authors: Janelle Tong, Jack Phu, Sieu K. Khuu, Nayuta Yoshioka, Agnes Y. Choi, Lisa Nivison-Smith, Robert E. Marc, Bryan W. Jones, Rebecca L. Pfeiffer, Michael Kalloniatis, and Barbara Zangerl.

Purpose: To develop location specific models of normal, age-related changes in the macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) from optical coherence tomography (OCT). Using these OCT-derived models, we predicted visual field (VF) sensitivity and compared these results to actual VF sensitivities.

Design: Retrospective cohort study

Methods: Single eyes of 254 normal participants were retrospectively enrolled from the Centre for Eye Health (Sydney, Australia). Macular GCL measurements were obtained using Spectralis OCT. Cluster algorithms were performed to identify spatial patterns demonstrating similar age- related change. Quadratic and linear regression models were subsequently utilized to characterize age-related GCL decline. 40 participants underwent additional testing with Humphrey VFs, and 95% prediction intervals were calculated to measure the predictive ability of structure-function models incorporating cluster-based pooling, age-correction and consideration of spatial summation.

Results: Quadratic GCL regression models provided a superior fit (p = <0.0001-0.0066), establishing that GCL decline commences in the late 30’s across the macula. The equivalent linear rates of GCL decline showed eccentricity-dependent variation (0.13μm/year centrally versus 0.06μm/year peripherally), however average, normalized GCL loss per year was consistent across the 64 macular measurement locations at 0.26%. The 95% prediction intervals describing predicted VF sensitivities were significantly narrower across all cluster- based structure-function models (3.79-4.99dB) compared with models without clustering applied (5.66-6.73dB, p <0.0001).

Conclusions: Combining spatial clustering with age-dependent regression allowed the development of robust models describing GCL changes with age. The resultant superior predictive ability of VF sensitivity from ganglion cell measurements may be applied to future models of disease development to improve detection of early macular GCL pathology.

Hypoxia Tolerance In The Norrin-Deficient Retina And The Chronically Hypoxic Brain Studied At Single-Cell Resolution

We have a new paper out in PNAS, Hypoxia tolerance in the Norrin-deficient retina and the chronically hypoxic brain studied at single-cell resolution.

Authors: Jacob S. Heng, Amir Rattner, Genevieve L. Stein-O’Brien, Briana L. Winer, Bryan W. Jones, Hilary J. Vernon, Loyal A. Goff, and Jeremy Nathans.

Abstract: The mammalian CNS is capable of tolerating chronic hypoxia, but cell type-specific responses to this stress have not been systematically characterized. In the Norrin KO (NdpKO) mouse, a model of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), developmental hypovascularization of the retina produces chronic hypoxia of inner nuclear-layer (INL) neurons and Muller glia. We used single-cell RNA sequencing, untargeted metabolomics, and metabolite labeling from 13C-glucose to compare WT and NdpKO retinas. In NdpKO retinas, we observe gene expression responses consistent with hypoxia in Muller glia and retinal neurons, and we find a metabolic shift that combines reduced flux through the TCA cycle with increased synthesis of serine, glycine, and glutathione. We also used single-cell RNA sequencing to compare the responses of individual cell types in NdpKO retinas with those in the hypoxic cerebral cortex of mice that were housed for 1 week in a reduced oxygen environment (7.5% oxygen). In the hypoxic cerebral cortex, glial transcriptome responses most closely resemble the response of Muller glia in the NdpKO retina. In both retina and brain, vascular endothelial cells activate a previously dormant tip cell gene expression program, which likely underlies the adaptive neoangiogenic response to chronic hypoxia. These analyses of retina and brain transcriptomes at single-cell resolution reveal both shared and cell type-specific changes in gene expression in response to chronic hypoxia, implying both shared and distinct cell type-specific physiologic responses.

Rod Bipolar Cell Networks In A Retinal Pathoconnectome

We presented a poster on Rod Bipolar Cell Networks In A Retinal Pathoconnectome at the 2019 HHMI Connectomics meeting in Berlin today. Downsampled PDF of poster here.

Authors: Rebecca L. Pfeiffer, James R. Anderson, Daniel P. Emrich, Jeebika Dahal, Crystal L. Sigulinsky, Jia-Hui Yang, Kevin D. Rapp, Carl B. Watt, Jessica C. Garcia, Mineo Kondo, Hiroko Terasaki, Robert E. Marc, and Bryan W. Jones.

Abstract: Ultrastructural connectomics has allowed for precise identification of neural network topologies in retina, exposing synaptic connectivity associated with specific pathways involved in neural retinal processing. In pathological degenerate retina such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), retinal remodeling emerges as a phenomenon through a series of negative plasticity events originating from neural deafferentation initiated by photoreceptor degeneration. Early stages of remodeling include glial changes, GluR receptor alterations (reprogramming), and rewiring of retinal networks. The connectivities initiated by these processes are currently unknown. To address this problem, we have created an ultrastructural pathoconnnectome of early retinal remodeling in a rabbit model of retinitis pigmentosa, Retinal Pathoconnectome 1 (RPC1).